Tuesday, April 23

Official Google Blog

Official Google Blog


Following the lead of nature’s engineers

Posted: 22 Apr 2013 06:56 AM PDT

It's no surprise that Google appreciates engineers. And this Earth Day, we're looking at some of our favorite engineers from nature to see how they can teach us to treat the environment better. We've created a website where we can see the beauty and ingenuity of the natural world through photos from National Geographic. We also want to provide easy ways to be greener in our own lives, so this site shows us how we can all be like those organisms by taking simple actions to care for the environment.


For instance, until recently I'd never heard of a remora. Turns out that these fish latch on to other ocean creatures such as whales and turtles to catch rides. In a way, these fish are using their own form of mass transit. To be like the remora and travel with a lighter footprint, we can plan trips using rapid transit. Or we can be inspired by bears—the true experts on "sleep mode"—to save energy in our own lives by adjusting our home thermostat and using energy efficient appliances.

Our doodle today also acknowledges the interconnections of the natural world. You can interact with elements of the environment to affect the seasons, weather and wildlife.


As another way to move from awareness to action, we're hosting a Google+ Hangout On Air series focused on pressing environmental issues. We'll kick it off today at 12pm ET with a Hangout on Air connecting NASA (live from Greenland), National Geographic explorers from around the world, and Underwater Earth (live from the Great Barrier reef). Throughout the week, we'll hold daily Hangouts on Air covering topics such as clean water and animal conservation.

This Earth Day and every day, let's take a moment to marvel at the wonder of nature and do our part to protect the natural ecosystem we all depend on. A salute to nature's engineers!

Happy birthday Campus London. You’ve grown up so fast.

Posted: 22 Apr 2013 12:00 AM PDT

Just over 12 months ago, Campus London opened its doors to the young, upcoming London tech startup community. I'd like to think we always knew it would succeed, but I don't think any of us expected the level of engagement and enthusiasm we've seen in year one.


In just 365 days of operation, Campus now has more than 10,000 members, permanently houses more than 100 young companies and has hosted more than 850 events, attracting more than 60,000 guests through the door. From individual entrepreneurs looking to explore their back-of-a-napkin idea to global venture fund managers, there's something for everyone in the London tech scene at Campus, and the vibe is electric.



We asked Campus members to provide their feedback and outlook on year one, and their response has been overwhelmingly positive. Campus-based companies are growing and creating jobs. One in four are already looking to find bigger office spaces to house their growing teams. We've also seen that the success of the London technology startup community as a whole has mirrored that of Campus.

Campus members are younger than the average Tech City entrepreneur, and with initiatives like Women@Campus, increasingly more female entrepreneurs are signing up. Campus is also truly international, with 22 nationalities working, interacting and attending the many mentoring sessions and classes we and our Google volunteers run every day.


Looking ahead to the next year and beyond, we're offering even more: more globally-acclaimed speakers, a new Campus EDU education programme offering mentorship from Googlers, inspirational talks from thought leaders like Guy Kawasaki, Eric Schmidt and Jimmy Wales, and a curriculum of classes to develop the skills young startups need to build successful businesses.

Google started as a two-person startup in a garage in California. We're looking to provide the best possible garage to our 10,000 members every day. And so far, all indicators show that Campus is one of the most exciting places in the world for technological innovation.

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