Wednesday, January 2

Official Google Blog

Official Google Blog


A little help from Google on your New Year’s resolutions

Posted: 01 Jan 2013 08:14 AM PST

The new year has arrived, and with it all the resolutions that we hope to tackle in 2013.

But resolutions can be hard to keep. And since eating better, taking control of personal finances, travelling more and learning something new regularly top the list of New Year's resolutions, we've pulled together some of our best tips and tricks across Google to make 2013 the year you succeed with your goals.

Eat better
  • Counting calories? Apps such as Diet Diary can be easily accessed through Chrome or your Android device—that way it's with you when it's on your mind. If spreadsheets are more your style, try one of several Google Docs templates, like this weekly meal planner.
  • Find recipes for healthy meals and how-to-cook videos with apps like BBC's Good Food for Chrome or food channels like Show me the Curry on YouTube.
  • Rely on the Google+ community for motivation and learn from others via hangouts on how to prepare healthy meals.
  • We know how easy it is to fall off track. Check out Google Play to find apps, books and music to keep you motivated.



Get fiscally fit
  • To control your finances, you need to know exactly where money is coming in and out. This simple budget template in Google Drive already has you halfway there.
  • If you prefer a more detailed budget, try using an app like Mint to track your finances on the go, available on both Android and Chrome.
  • Keep track of your stock portfolio and related market news via Google Finance or with brokerage apps like E*TRADE from Google Play.

Travel more
  • Use Google Flight Search to quickly compare flight times and costs across airlines. Try the "tourist spotlight" feature on Google Hotel Finder to find a room near the hottest spots in the city.
  • Simply type [tourist attractions <city name>] into Google Search to see some of the top points of interest. Once you have a list of the things you want to do and see, keep it in one place and share it with your travel buddies using Google Sheets
  • Never get lost with Google Maps. Whether your plans are local or international, indoors or out, comprehensive and accurate Google Maps can help you find your way.

Learn something new
If your resolution wasn't listed here, try checking out SELF Magazine's Google+ page with tips from experts, live via Google+ hangouts, for 13 more resolutions starting on January 13.

Research shows that you're more likely to achieve your resolutions if you write them down and have support. Try sharing your goals with communities around you. When you're ready to share your new year's ambition with the world, or if you're interested in seeing what resolutions look like around the globe, add it to the interactive resolution map on our 2012 Zeitgeist website.


No matter who you are, the web can help you do anything.

Marking the birth of the modern-day Internet

Posted: 01 Jan 2013 12:01 AM PST

Today is the 30th birthday of the modern-day Internet. Five years ago we marked the occasion with a doodle. This year we invited Vint Cerf to tell the story. Vint is widely regarded as one of the fathers of the Internet for his contributions to shaping the Internet's architecture, including co-designing the TCP/IP protocol. Today he works with Google to promote and protect the Internet. -Ed.

A long time ago, my colleagues and I became part of a great adventure, teamed with a small band of scientists and technologists in the U.S. and elsewhere. For me, it began in 1969, when the potential of packet switching communication was operationally tested in the grand ARPANET experiment by the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

Other kinds of packet switched networks were also pioneered by DARPA, including mobile packet radio and packet satellite, but there was a big problem. There was no common language. Each network had its own communications protocol using different conventions and formatting standards to send and receive packets, so there was no way to transmit anything between networks.

In an attempt to solve this, Robert Kahn and I developed a new computer communication protocol designed specifically to support connection among different packet-switched networks. We called it TCP, short for "Transmission Control Protocol," and in 1974 we published a paper about it in IEEE Transactions on Communications: "A Protocol for Packet Network Intercommunication." Later, to better handle the transmission of real-time data, including voice, we split TCP into two parts, one of which we called "Internet Protocol," or IP for short. The two protocols combined were nicknamed TCP/IP.

TCP/IP was tested across the three types of networks developed by DARPA, and eventually was anointed as their new standard. In 1981, Jon Postel published a transition plan to migrate the 400 hosts of the ARPANET from the older NCP protocol to TCP/IP, including a deadline of January 1, 1983, after which point all hosts not switched would be cut off.



From left to right: Vint Cerf in 1973, Robert Kahn in the 1970's, Jon Postel

When the day came, it's fair to say the main emotion was relief, especially amongst those system administrators racing against the clock. There were no grand celebrations—I can't even find a photograph. The only visible mementos were the "I survived the TCP/IP switchover" pins proudly worn by those who went through the ordeal!


Yet, with hindsight, it's obvious it was a momentous occasion. On that day, the operational Internet was born. TCP/IP went on to be embraced as an international standard, and now underpins the entire Internet.

It's been almost 40 years since Bob and I wrote our paper, and I can assure you while we had high hopes, we did not dare to assume that the Internet would turn into the worldwide platform it's become. I feel immensely privileged to have played a part and, like any proud parent, have delighted in watching it grow. I continue to do what I can to protect its future. I hope you'll join me today in raising a toast to the Internet—may it continue to connect us for years to come.

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